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Thread: The Manch

  1. #76
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    Pookapotamus is offline Level: Uber Jeep Cherokee Trailer Queen
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    Default Re: The Manch

    Its not complete, but I am working on it, and its all on one page, little easier to understand than several connecting pages, and there are lots of upgrades and addons that I feel should have been included in a stock XJ. I will start posting updated ones in my build thread.

    P.S. That pic is already out of date!
    Last edited by Pookapotamus; 01-17-2016 at 02:42 PM.

  2. #77
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    Default Re: The Manch

    Quote Originally Posted by ZachXJ1993 View Post
    Step 3. Take said wiring and put it in the "I might still need this" box and then call it a day.

    Put the box at the back of a shelf ... Ive got 3 milkcrates that look like that,


    ... and its been many, many, many, days since I had the urge to poke around in them ..


    ... and I'll just post these pics of an aussie blokes, dash upgrade ... for your consideration.




    I hate watching simplicity and reliability being ruined by bureaucracy and technology.

    Quote Originally Posted by MattybPDX
    If my jeep is going to be a grocery getter it's at least going to be a friggin awesome one.

  3. #78
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    Default Re: The Manch

    I'm not a huge fan of wood grain, but I like the layout of those gauges.

    Thanks for the idea.
    Zach

  4. #79
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    Default Re: The Manch

    Well I've got some pictures to share with everyone.
    I have made some big changes to my game plan on the Manch.
    A buddy of mine recently acquired a 93 YJ as a parts Jeep For his 1 ton build. It has a good drivetrain in it and he is now parting just about everything out.
    The YJ has 140k on the clock and was in pretty good condition.
    I am still going to be running the Chevy 5.7 out of the 1990 pickup, but I've opted to stay away from the 260k mile 700r4 that is in that truck. The YJ has a 4.0L H.O. and an AX15 trans, as well as a NP231J with a SYE installed. I'm going to run the AX15 with my V8 because why not. The trans was a steal at 200, and I think that a 5 speed behind that 350 will be a kick in the pants.
    I did some checking because I was planning to run the 231J that was mounted behind the AW4 in the Manch, but the t-case inputs are different. The AW4 uses a 21 spline output and the AX15 has a 23 spline. It's not the end of the world because I can swap input gears in the transfercase and add a SYE kit. However the cheapest I've been able to find a 23 spline input for is about 70 bucks off Fleebay. And then you need different bearings which are another 40 or so bucks. Then add 200 for a SYE kit and I'd have paid for the t-case that my buddy is selling.
    Another Interesting thing to note is that the NP241C that my GMC donor truck has is basically a beefed up 231J. the 241 has a wider chain and a 27 spline input. But the part I care most about is the 241C has a 6 gear planetary and the 231J only has a 3 gear planetary. I'm about 90% sure that they are interchangeable. And if they are I'll be running the 241C planetary in my 231J. I'll let yall know if that is something that can be swapped in or not.


    After I got to looking at doing the AX15 conversion I was worried that the cost would far out weigh the benefits of the manual over the tired 700r4, but I was able to source some stuff for cheap.

    I looked at two both of the two companies that I knew of that made adapters to do what I wanted, which were Novak Adapt and Advance Adapter.
    The AA kit was is just under 500 and uses a 1-off adapter bellhousing. Then you are required to run their proprietary starter motor and mount for an additional 250. The clutch slave that the kit uses is off of a Toyota Land Cruiser and is not included in the kit. I think also you can only run a 10.5" clutch and 153 tooth flywheel with their kit. Which is why you have to run their special starter. To me it just seemed like a few too many 1-off parts that are expensive and are not available locally.

    I looked up on Novak's site and saw that they had a adapter that was used to attach a GM bellhousing to the AX15. I called up Novak and started asking tons of questions about anything I could think of. They were very knowledgeable and helpful and made sure I understood what was required to make the swap happen. Their kit uses a standard GM bellhousing and a standard gm clutch and flywheel that was designed to fit the Chevy small block. As far as the slave cylinder goes they sell a kit but it was backordered. Overall the Novak kit seemed like a better choice because of availability of replacement parts and I can use stuff I already have.

    I'm going to try and adapt the jeep external slave to work with the GM bellhousing. I'm not sure it will have enough travel to move the clutch fork but I'll give it a go. I'll prolly use the pedal out of that YJ as well.
    After I figured I wanted to commit to the AX15 conversion I started calling around looking for a GM standard bellhousing.

    I was able to find one at a local yard for 35 bucks!! It came out of a 1975 1-ton Chevy and came with the pivot ball and a fork as well. Even came with a custom grease/clutch dust coating.









    I got it all cleaned up and ready for new paint. One big reason I wanted to clean it was to inspect it for cracks because there were decent size bits of an exploded clutch stuck in the grease. It's pretty awesome how something made 40+ years ago will clean up and look good as new. I think it shows the quality of the materials and methods used to make the parts. And no cracks!






    Here is a picture of the drivetrain we janked out of that YJ.





    This is the AX15 sans T-case back at my shop.









    Rear 23 spline output





    Clutch slave removed.







    I then proceeded to remove the Jeep bellhousing.





    There are nine bolts that hold the bellhousing to the transmission.







    This is The Novak Adapt kit:

    The main adapter plate which replaces the front input bearing retainer plate and includes a new shaft seal.

    Bellhousing side:




    Trans Side:





    This ring is machined to size the centerhole in the bellhousing from 5 1\18" down to 4 11\16". I believe this is required on all bellhousings newer than 1965. It makes sure that the bellhousing and the adapter/transmission are concentric.





    This is the GM throwout bearing sleeve that is made to bolt to the adapter plate instead of being one piece like on the standard AX15 front bearing retainer.






    You have to specify which pilot bushing that you need based on what year of AX15 you have and whether you are using a gen 1 or 2 small block or a LS based GM engine.





    Novak supplies you a bag-O hardware to mount everything up.




    Overall I am very happy with the quality of the Novak Kit and I'm excited to get all the bits and bobs attached and put together.
    Looks like I better get that V8 pulled...

    Let me know what you guys think. I'm really interested in your input and if you have any experience please share!

    Thanks,
    Zach

  5. #80
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    Default Re: The Manch

    Ha ha, you are working your way back. By the way, you can change that tcase input without a new bearing. Done that one. Keep up the good work
    230 hp 4.3L Chevy
    Built 4L60E with manual lockout
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    And a bunch of other stuff

  6. #81
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    Default Re: The Manch

    Looks great. I'm learning with every post so keep it up!

    Sent via messenger pigeon. I talk, he types.

  7. #82
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    Default Re: The Manch

    Wait What? A new post in the Manch thread?
    So it's been quite a while since iv'e posted up here. But I have some pretty good progress to share. I have a larger pile of parts than I did a couple months ago. Now it's time to do something about it. Today was a pretty productive day. The drivetrain has been Janked out of the GMC and I seperated the trans and 5.7. I had some good help getting the engine out today, but I have been working on prepping for the pull for a week or so.

    I started by getting all the junk out of the way. Core support, radiator, evap coil, wiring, hoses, basically everything that wasn't attached to the engine or trans.









    This was from this morning. A load leveler is a must we found out today. We pulled two complete drivetrains today and it makes a huge difference when trying to wiggle the whole thing out under the cab.





    Apparently you can seal anything with enough duct tape...




    And then I got them fellers seperated and then got the engine hung on a stand for a little TLC.






    More progress coming soon.
    I plan to take the the engine down to the short block and then change the headgaskets and the valve guide seals. It smoked pretty bad when I was driving it around last year. I also picked up complete top end gasket set, timing cover gasket, front crank seal, rear main set, oil pan gasket, valve cover gaskets, new water pump, cap, rotor, plugs, wires, and alternator. As well as a new clutch, flywheel, and pressure plate. Should be pretty sweet when I get it all back together and painted up orange.

    Thanks for reading and commenting.
    Zach

  8. #83
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    Default Re: The Manch

    Time for another update on the Manch. I've got some good things started.
    I'll let the pictures explain for the most part. My intentions with the donor 350 were to take it down to the short block and do gaskets, seals, and a coat of paint. hahaha Right!!!!

    Got the engine hung on a stand.





    I wasn't surprised to find lots of baked oil crust and residue after popping off one of the valve covers.
    So I decided to continue the search deeper into the beast. I took the EFI bits off the intake manifold next and found the entire inside of the intake coated with dried and crusty oil. No good. Probably sucked excessive oil through a bad PCV valve. Oh and It's got 260k miles on the clock, which might have something to do with it.
    Anywho onto the guts.

    This is the moment I knew the ship was sunk. Under the intake was nasty. there was oil cake everywhere and oil buildup on all the surfaces.





    After finding that mess in the lifter valley I figured it couldn't get much worse and figured that a rebuild was going to be in the near future.

    The next song was to get the rockers loose and pull the heads. I pulled the passenger head first. Under there were black pistons and worn cylinder walls.





    This is a shot of cylinder #4. It was in the worst shape of the 4 on this side.
    What appeared to be a thick carbon ring around the top of the cylinder was actually a wear ring in the bore. #4 was wore about .012" over all the way around. That ring made it a pain to remove the pistons.





    This is the underside of the passenger head.





    The intake ports were pretty sad as well. And the water ports were full of crud. Along where the intake mates up to the head there was evidence of gasket failure.





    This is after removing all the pistons and rods. The crank seemed to be in pretty good shape. Even wear across all the rod journals and mains.





    Here is the timing set, which like everything in this engine was worn out.





    I pulled the cam and found plenty of wear on all the lobes. I'd imagine the cam was pretty flat.





    All in all I had three choices. Buy another used engine and take a gamble, buy a rebuilt or crate long block, or have mine gone through by a machine shop.
    I decide to go get a second opinion and took the long block down and had it all looked at. They confirmed what I figured and recommended some machine work based on the tolerances they found throughout the engine. They gave me a very reasonable quote to do the work. So I decided to do a full rebuild on the engine I already had.
    One other reason that I chose to rebuild instead of buy new is I like to support local business.

    So then the waiting began. hahaha every time my phone rang I was hoping it was the shop calling to let me know it was ready. I felt like a ten year old during the week before Christmas. Is it here yet? Is it time? Anywho I'm glad I went the way I did.


    When I went to go pick it up I was amazed at the transformation.

    The block, heads, and rods were tanked and cleaned as well as inspected for cracks.

    The cylinders were bored .030" over to clean up the walls and to allow for a good hone.
    The block was squared up in relation to the crankshaft by machining the decks flat.
    New camshaft bearings were installed as well as new oil and freeze plugs.
    To top it off it was painted black.







    On the heads the seats had some bad pitting, and the guides were wore.
    New guides, and seats were installed and lapped to the Valves.
    The heads were machined to get them nice and flat as well.




    The main caps were in good shape so no need for line honing. New standard size bearings were used on the mains.
    The crankshaft was within spec so the main and rod journals were polished.
    Here it is ready for install







    Crankshaft installed and torqued to spec.





    The factory rods were inspected and installed onto new pistons.
    New piston rings used as well.





    Here is the bottom end with all the rods torqued to spec.





    The camshaft is new. It is a sealed power flat tappet cam with a mild torque profile. It was less expensive than the speced OE cam. And I'll have a bit more torque to boot.
    If you are interested I can post a picture of the Cam-sheet that lists the specs and the part number.
    The truck engine came factory with a flat tappet cam rather than a roller cam. The block has provisions for a roller cam but the price to upgrade was a bit more than what I wanted to spend.





    New timing set.





    New lifters.





    Heads installed and torqued to spec.





    New pushrods and rocker arms.
    Valves lashed and pre-load set.





    The stock TBI intake was pretty awful. It had some buildup in it that wouldn't come out. So instead of risking my rebuild not running right because of that intake I decided to replace it.
    This is a Eldebrock Performer TBI intake. Basically it is the factory Gm part but it has a few things done to increase performance.





    I installed a new oil pump as well as new pickup screen. I did some research and Meling recommended it be set 3/8 above the pan bottom and welded to keep it from moving.





    The timing cover, oil pan braces, fuel pump block off plate got painted Chevrolet orange.
    I decided to replace the oil pan and the valve covers because the insides of them were more than I wanted to clean. The oil pan a a sizable crease in it as well.
    I was able to find some replacements for pretty inexpensive.
    I am going to run a remote oil filter, with temperature bypass for a oil cooler. So you can see the adapter installed in the block. It has two 1/2 NPT holes and I'm using some AN-10 fittings and braided hose to complete the filter circuit.







    The valve covers I bought came chrome, but I don't believe in chrome. There will be other parts on this Jeep that will "get me home". So I painted them to match the theme.

    Before...





    After...





    There are other things that I have done like clean up the accessory brackets and paint the pulleys. I put all the parts in the blast cabinet and went to town. I also replaced the bearing on the belt tensioner.

    before...





    after...









    Overall It has been way fun and a good experience to build an engine. I can't wait for first start. I feel pretty accomplished with the work I've put into cleaning and assembly.

    There is plenty more to do still, but I'm making progress.

    Let me know if you have any questions. And comments and pointers are always welcome.
    Thanks again for reading and commenting.
    Zach

  9. #84
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    Default Re: The Manch

    Nothing like clean, tight and shiny. Nice job
    230 hp 4.3L Chevy
    Built 4L60E with manual lockout
    Atlas 4 speed
    Griffin radiator
    On board air
    Warn 9.5ti on custom bumper
    7.5" RE front and bastard pack rear on custom long arms
    30 gal gas tank
    lockers
    And a bunch of other stuff

  10. #85
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    Default Re: The Manch

    I haven't done it many times, and I'm always nervous on that first start up, but engine building is fun.

  11. #86
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    Default Re: The Manch

    Looks great! Like the colour scheme!


    Having 4WD means getting stuck in more inaccessible places!

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