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  1. #16
    whowey Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by firehawk View Post
    About everyone I know uses the FSR radio now, at least for hunting/scouting. I tried to get a Jeep club I belong to to use them, but they stick with CB's.

    CB's are getting kinda hard to find anymore, plus isn't it kind of outdated technology?

    Just my .02 worth.

    Have you ever been out to one of the off-road parks on a holiday weekend???

    FRS(family radio service) units are almost completely worthless...
    The sheer amount of them there makes it almost impossible to find a quiet channel to use.

    Also about 99% of these units are combo GMRS/FRS units. The "high power" channels actually require an FCC license to use legally. The "low power" channels are the ones that are usable without a license. Yes, I realize that the chances that you would be caught are almost non-existent. But people like Muddy and I(and several others on this site) already posses an FCC license in another service. We are expected to know better. If we were caught using one of these radios illegally, we are going to punished much harsher than a person without one.

    And from a technical standpoint, these units really are not a good choice in a wheeling environment. They operate only FM mode in the UHF spectrum. This means while they sound really good at short open distances. The signals are EXTREMELY susceptible to being absorbed by ground cover,trees hills, etc. Or in other terms most of the wheeling environment. The low power output(half a watt, IIRC) and short, permantly fixed antenna just make the problem worse.

    While CB is kinda of an out-of-fad technology, its actually a good solution. With a common availabilty, absolutely no 'tech-fear' level from users. The price is fairly reasonable for a set-up and there is a pretty good selection of equipment for someone that wants something fancier.

  2. #17
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    I know this might sound lame but I have no idea about any of this stuff. I have a motorola walk about witch I think is the FSR you are talking about and have had a little time with a CB.
    Whatever you have there in your set up Mudderoy is purley bad A** looking!
    I wan't one but it sounds way over my pay grade, Is it a ham or what?
    I would like to learn more but remember I'm a virgin.
    Im surprisingly comfortable with it.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by whowey View Post
    Have you ever been out to one of the off-road parks on a holiday weekend???

    FRS(family radio service) units are almost completely worthless...
    The sheer amount of them there makes it almost impossible to find a quiet channel to use.
    I can't even imagine seens how the nearest thing to a off road park we have here is MOAB, ever been there on easter???? Even CB's are worthless.
    Im surprisingly comfortable with it.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by whowey View Post
    Have you ever been out to one of the off-road parks on a holiday weekend???

    FRS(family radio service) units are almost completely worthless...
    The sheer amount of them there makes it almost impossible to find a quiet channel to use.

    Also about 99% of these units are combo GMRS/FRS units. The "high power" channels actually require an FCC license to use legally. The "low power" channels are the ones that are usable without a license. Yes, I realize that the chances that you would be caught are almost non-existent. But people like Muddy and I(and several others on this site) already posses an FCC license in another service. We are expected to know better. If we were caught using one of these radios illegally, we are going to punished much harsher than a person without one.

    And from a technical standpoint, these units really are not a good choice in a wheeling environment. They operate only FM mode in the UHF spectrum. This means while they sound really good at short open distances. The signals are EXTREMELY susceptible to being absorbed by ground cover,trees hills, etc. Or in other terms most of the wheeling environment. The low power output(half a watt, IIRC) and short, permantly fixed antenna just make the problem worse.

    While CB is kinda of an out-of-fad technology, its actually a good solution. With a common availabilty, absolutely no 'tech-fear' level from users. The price is fairly reasonable for a set-up and there is a pretty good selection of equipment for someone that wants something fancier.
    Keep in mind that we are at a solar minimum right now. So there isn't so much random transmission coming from 500+ miles away to interferer with your conversation. This will be changing dramatically (or should) over the next 4 to 5 years. Signals (skip) can get so loud during the day that all you will hears is a constant screaming of signals.

    I have heard that many off roaders are looking into 2 meter HAM radio. FM VHF signals, and good for several miles. Using a repeater you can have clear conversations with people 30 miles apart.

  5. #20
    whowey Guest

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    Absolutely 2 meters would be a fantastic choice for off-roaders. The equipment is durable, the frequencies and power levels used are just about perfect for the environment. Many repeater owners would like the extra traffic and most amateur operators would be very accommodating to the traffic.


    The pricing of the equipment is always going to be a bit of a deterrent to wider spread usage. For what a good antenna and mount costs, you can have a complete CB set-up. Also while the test is pretty easy, some people aren't good with the concepts addressed in the Tech license. And of course there will always be some small portion of the amateur population that will rage like bloody murder over a new group on the air that has any sort of purpose beyond stale, boring, dull net ops.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by whowey View Post
    Absolutely 2 meters would be a fantastic choice for off-roaders. The equipment is durable, the frequencies and power levels used are just about perfect for the environment. Many repeater owners would like the extra traffic and most amateur operators would be very accommodating to the traffic.


    The pricing of the equipment is always going to be a bit of a deterrent to wider spread usage. For what a good antenna and mount costs, you can have a complete CB set-up. Also while the test is pretty easy, some people aren't good with the concepts addressed in the Tech license. And of course there will always be some small portion of the amateur population that will rage like bloody murder over a new group on the air that has any sort of purpose beyond stale, boring, dull net ops.
    You can get a 50 watt 2 meter mobile radio for less than 200, and an antenna "Larson" for less than 50. eBay you can get that mobile for closer to 100. I agree about the repeater operators though, but hey there's always simplex!

  7. #22
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    What does it take to have/build a repeater? Who usually operates them?

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    Quote Originally Posted by prerunner1982 View Post
    What does it take to have/build a repeater? Who usually operates them?
    Any HAM with a Advance class license or higher. You have to be assigned a frequency which is usually the problem finding a pair that hasn't been assigned. That might just be in the Houston area though.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mudderoy View Post
    Any HAM with a Advance class license or higher. You have to be assigned a frequency which is usually the problem finding a pair that hasn't been assigned. That might just be in the Houston area though.
    What is the cost of having a tower and does the owner get any benefit out of it besides helping other operators gain some distance?

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    Quote Originally Posted by prerunner1982 View Post
    What is the cost of having a tower and does the owner get any benefit out of it besides helping other operators gain some distance?
    No benefit that I can think of. I mean if you get a good group on the repeater it's entertaining. Basically it's like this website. You get to chat with the same people each day. Usually going to or coming home from work.

  11. #26
    whowey Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mudderoy View Post
    Any HAM with a Advance class license or higher. You have to be assigned a frequency which is usually the problem finding a pair that hasn't been assigned. That might just be in the Houston area though.


    That's been changed. Any liscensed amateur can own a repeater. It just has to be in a frequency and mode that your liscense allows. And trying to find an unassigned pair in any major city is going to be a problem. Too bad many repeaters are off the air, or worse closed.

    http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/cfr_20...7cfr97.205.pdf
    Last edited by whowey; 09-22-2009 at 09:48 PM.

  12. #27
    whowey Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by prerunner1982 View Post
    What does it take to have/build a repeater? Who usually operates them?
    Quote Originally Posted by prerunner1982 View Post
    What is the cost of having a tower and does the owner get any benefit out of it besides helping other operators gain some distance?

    Repeaters can be very simple or quite complex. They can be as simple as a pair of heavy duty radios that are set-up to operate in duplex mode. Or they can be as complicated as to need racks of equipment, with telephone and internet interchanges, multiple tone generators, automatic operation modes, and recording capabilities.

    Operations are alot of times controlled by clubs or special interest groups. The price of building, maintaining and operating a nice repeater can reach into the tens of thousands a year. Where a bargin basement one could just be a few hundred to build and maintain.

    Tower costs depend entirely on the style, placement and usage of the tower. Renting space on a commerical tower can cost thousands a year, but the owner may have upwards of 100k invested in the construction of the tower. A commercial owner gets rent from the other antennas and repeaters hosted on their tower. This can lead to them blaming amateur radio repeaters for problems, as many times the amateur repeaters are lower end equipment and the amateurs may pay a much lesser rent than other commercial users.

    A quick example of a cheap repeater. I have a friend that has a couple of repeater pairs wanted to put something up in the small town we live in. He wanted something small for really local operations, primarly him and his wife while they work around town. We put a 20 foot former wireless cable antenna mast and a small vinyl shed on the roof of his 4 story apartment building in our town. The power is nothing more than a weather-proof extension cord that runs to the building power. The antennas and radios are simply commercial service cast-offs he bought from the junk bin at a local radio supplier.

    Now our large county radio club has three repeaters. Two are former county sheriff units that were re-tuned for amateur usage. These came with all the bells, whistles and appendages that the sheriff would have. Both are provided free as the Sheriff's office claims these as 'back-up' communications systems under the IEMA plan. But if the club had to buy these repeaters, they would have cost 5000-10,000 with out installation costs.

  13. #28
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    Mudd & Whowey... thank you. (thank you button is gone..??)

    I find this all very interesting...

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    I still think this might be a little over my head. Im guna try to look in to it still tho.
    Im surprisingly comfortable with it.

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    Icon12 Jeep

    Thank you for me being a member of your forums

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